This Week’s Preset: TimeLine – Orobas Presets

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Los Angeles-based Orobas are a writing and production team that creates their diverse, electronic-infused music utilizing real instruments, looping, and live recording. On their first release, guitarist Nick Casale, DJ/bassist John Gallo, and recently-added drummer Steve Ciccone (not pictured) have created a polished collection of songs packed with melody, movement, and texture. Their debut single “Picture” (featuring Omri) blends rock, ambient and electrogaze into an atmospheric, driving song featuring strong guitars and a hooky vocal performance. The follow-up single, “Dust” (featuring Sweedish, heard on Fox’s Empire), arguably the most radio-friendly track on the album, expertly blends pop vocals and pulsing rhythms with an unorthodox song structure and a lush instrument-focused second act. The genre-spanning album, which is a mix of vocal and instrumental tracks, is currently on iTunes, Spotify, and Soundcloud and available as a free download on their Bandcamp page.

Below Nick shares a couple of choice presets from his TimeLine, which was used extensively on the album. The first patch is a lush, modulated pattern-based reverb used throughout the song “Picture,” and the second is an atmospheric, rhythmic delay used on the song “Dust.”

Preset One – “Picture” (Feat. Omri)

“Picture” was the second track we wrote for the album and one of those songs that came together really quickly and just clicked. I’m normally guilty of some pretty serious self-deprecation, but I’m really happy with this track, start to finish. This song (including the main chord progression) was written and recorded on my Les Paul with TV Jones Powertrons in it (my humbucker of choice), in a slightly unusual tuning: DADGCD (the whole album is actually in this tuning). I’m a sucker for open strings, odd tunings, and anything that opens up new riffs and chord voicings.

All the clean guitar on the album was done at John’s studio, direct off my pedal board (in stereo) primarily using Strymon stuff for any delays, reverbs, and most of the modulation. We recorded and wrapped on this track before I had gotten my hands on my BigSky, so I had experimented with making reverb-esque ambience with my Timeline, which actually worked quite well. This preset is the verb I used on the intro and choruses.

Here’s the song:

And here’s the preset:

Orobas Picture TimeLine Preset

Preset Two – “Dust” (Feat. Sweedish)

Definitely the poppiest tune on the album, and to be honest, not the kind of music I usually play, but John came in with this simple, hooky guitar riff and beat (heard at the intro) that had something to it. I really like the structure, the sounds we created, and movement of this song. I’m also proud of the bridge and how it devolves, then gradually morphs back into the chorus. Props to our friend Sweedish who absolutely crushed the vocals on this entire song. She’s an incredible writer and performer who I highly recommend checking out.

This preset is the same dotted-eighth delay I used throughout the first verse which I dialed in to provide some lengthy ambience but still keep a strong rhythm.

Here’s the song:

And here’s the preset:

Orobas Dust TimeLine Preset

Thanks for checking out our music, and hope you enjoyed it and the presets. The TimeLine seems to pop out new awesomeness every time I dive into it. Our entire album is up everywhere for streaming and even a free download on our Bandcamp page.

Download the presets:

Using the Strymon Librarian or our new Nixie preset editor?  Download the presets and load them into your TimeLine!

Download Preset One:  Orobas – “Picture”

Download Preset Two:  Orobas – “Dust”

What do you think?

Made your own tweaks to these presets? Post them below. Are there other preset types that you’d like to see in upcoming blog posts? Let us know what you think. Thanks!

About Matt Piper
Matt Piper Matt Piper writes words and makes videos for Strymon. He plays guitar and a variety of other instruments but sucks at drums and a much larger variety of other instruments. He also makes electronic noises and teaches Fundamentals of Synthesis at the Los Angeles College of Music in Pasadena, California.

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